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Best way to rope solo
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By Brasky
Jan 15, 2013

Curious on the best way to rope solo with or with out specialized gear i did it which a clove hitch and a prussic tying into my anchor but its a pain. Any thoughts?


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By Superclimber
Jan 15, 2013

Many ways to skin this cat and a lot of threads exist on this, so you if you search a bit you'll probably find lots of ideas. Assuming you're talking about toprope soloing, I do the following.

-Put a knot in the middle of the rope where you clip the top anchor to create to independant strands.
-Use a Cinch on one side and an Ushba ascender on the other side.
-Ball up some rope at the bottom or tie on a pack or something to add weight and help the rope feed.
-Try not to fall on it, instead set down gently. I've read that falling on the Ushba might damage the rope. Haven't had that happen first hand, but I can see the potential.
-Usually no need to mess with it while climbing because the ropes feed pretty well.
-Lower by holding the Ushba lower than the Cinch in one hand and working the lever on the Cinch with the other hand.

This system works well, but be careful.

You're gonna die.


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By bearbreeder
Jan 16, 2013

www.petzl.com/en/outdoor/product-experience/self-belay-solo->>>


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By Healyje
Jan 16, 2013
girl40

Brasky wrote:
Curious on the best way to rope solo with or with out specialized gear i did it which a clove hitch and a prussic tying into my anchor but its a pain. Any thoughts?


For anyone discussing rope solo, the first thing you need to do is distinguish between TR soloing, Aid soloing, and Free lead rope soloing.


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By Jake Jones
From Richmond, VA
Jan 16, 2013
Me and the offspring walking back to the car after a day of cragging.

All the information you could ever want- and by the same folks that would answer your question here anyways. CLICK HERE


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By Brasky
Jan 16, 2013

I was interested in lead soloing. I used a clove hitch and just rolled it out on a 5.5 but it was pretty iced up and a real hassel to stop and roll out the clove with one hand and then i had to down climb to retrieve my gear because the bolted anchors were on the otherside of the pillar. This was all in effort to climb a namesake climb in durango and well worth it but just looking for any helpful tips best devices whatever thanks for the help


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By Peter Stokes
From Them Thar Hills
Jan 16, 2013
Wall Street, Moab, UT

There are probably some other threads on this site about lead rope soloing, and most of them probably contain stuff about the Soloist, the Silent Partner, and modified Gri-Gri. The cheapest way to do it is with a Gri-Gri, and the safest way to use one of those is with the mod for keeping it upright combined with a chest harness. I just use an un-modified Gri-Gri with a regular harness, but I also use a one way pulley (Petzl MiniTraxion) to feed the rope from my pack into the Gri-Gri so it doesn't go into lock mode from the weight of the rope as I move upward. I also use a steel locker on the first bolt, since it gets jacked around (and possibly cross-loaded) a lot more than it would on a regular lead with a belayer.

I don't use this system on anything real difficult- if you want to lead solo on hard stuff I'd suggest using one of the safer setups designed for it. Or find a belayer- I've heard climbing is getting popular these days...


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By Michael C
From New Jersey
Jan 16, 2013
Mt Minsi, PA

I've been considering top-rope soloing at a nearby cliff. I like the two rope method (device on one rope, clipping knots on a 2nd rope) illustrated on the petzl link. At the same time, I feel pretty lame going out to climb by myself.


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By Brasky
Jan 16, 2013

I top solo all the time with the micro trax with that det up i use a chain reactor. I love it i get out and climb when evr I want and on sunny das you can usually hop on other peoples ropes. if your trying the top rope solo be careful because you always have a weighted strand and if your doing anything with a roof that strand is gana be sitting on the lip weighted moving back and forth a recipe for disaster.


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By Brasky
Jan 16, 2013

Also if you take a fall with the mini on the rope will it cut the sheath? or worse the rope or does the force get taken by the gri gri I dont think i quite understand your setup


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By Peter Stokes
From Them Thar Hills
Jan 16, 2013
Wall Street, Moab, UT

When I fall on lead solo, the MiniTrax doesn't damage the rope because it's on the feed side- the Gri-Gri takes the fall load. To prevent the Gri-Gri from locking up I have to pull enough rope through the pulley to make the next move, which leaves a significant loop of rope that can get in the way if I'm not careful. Again, not the best way to climb, so I usually use this setup to get up to the anchors on something easier in order to setup a toprope solo on something harder. I also only do this on bolted routes- it's sketch enough that I don't need to make things any worse by also relying on gear placements. If you're not sure about how to do this it's a good idea to practice somewhere safe (or relatively safe) while you figure out what works and what doesn't.


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By Brasky
Jan 16, 2013

Ok that makes sense i did a similair set up with a prussik and a clove hitch I rolled out the clove enough to make the next move and then slid the prussik I did it on a 5.5 ~ 5.6 trad climb but it was only a single pitch to bolts. But I like the idea with the gri gri


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By John McNamee
Administrator
From Littleton, CO
Jan 16, 2013
Artist Tears P3

If you are going to solo lead climb on a regular basis, at least spend a couple hundred bucks and buy a device that is designed for the job. Your life is worth that. I use a silent partner. Works like a charm.


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By kenr
Jan 16, 2013

One advantage of the Silent Partner for leading is that if I discover I've gotten off the route, it's straightforward to down-climb with it (and manually feed the rope thru it the "wrong" way each time I get a good stance while down-climbing -- to reduce the amount of slack).

I don't know any other device that is not a big pain to feed the rope thru the "other" way when you decide to climb down instead of up.

If I'm on interesting rock (which else would I be soloing?) often I find down-climbing to be another dimension of enjoying it and mastering it. With the Silent Partner it's easy to down-climb to clean, instead of rappeling.

Traversing sections -- With the Silent Partner it's straightforward to first lead the traversing section in the forward direction, and then go back in the reverse direction to remove the anchor, and then forward again to clean.

Ken


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