Route Guide - iPhone / Android - Partners - Forum - Photos - Deals - What's New - School of Rock
Login with Facebook
 ADVANCED
best surface for crack machine?
View Latest Posts in This Forum or All Forums
   Page 1 of 1.  
Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
 
By Optimistic
From New Paltz
Nov 8, 2011

Hi:

I want to build a little mini crack machine, just big enough to do pullups and hangs from.

I've seen a few threads on here suggesting that bare, sanded wood would be the best surface in terms of skin-friendliness, others saying that's not so good. One thread showed a fellow using a crack machine with leather gloves, guess I'd rather avoid that if possible, especially if I'm going to try to get down to smaller sizes. Probably where I could use the most training right now is 0.75 camalot size, and I think gloves would pretty well defeat the purpose there.

I was thinking of maybe trying to face the wood with some kind of stone, but would be interested in hearing of other approaches folks have had success with.

Cheers,
David


FLAG
By camhead
From Vandalia, Appalachia
Nov 8, 2011
You stay away from mah pig!

David Horgan wrote:
Hi: I want to build a little mini crack machine, just big enough to do pullups and hangs from. I've seen a few threads on here suggesting that bare, sanded wood would be the best surface in terms of skin-friendliness, others saying that's not so good. One thread showed a fellow using a crack machine with leather gloves, guess I'd rather avoid that if possible, especially if I'm going to try to get down to smaller sizes. Probably where I could use the most training right now is 0.75 camalot size, and I think gloves would pretty well defeat the purpose there. I was thinking of maybe trying to face the wood with some kind of stone, but would be interested in hearing of other approaches folks have had success with. Cheers, David


grip tape, but that will make the surface probably more high friction than any real rock would ever be.


FLAG
By Stich
From Colorado Springs, Colorado
Nov 8, 2011
Coffee after freezing our asses off near James Peak.

Actually, just sand and paint it. A friend used sandpaper once on his crack machine and it was too painful to climb bare handed. You want to be able to use it without gloves. You'll enjoy it a lot more.


FLAG
By Optimistic
From New Paltz
Nov 8, 2011

Stich wrote:
Actually, just sand and paint it. A friend used sandpaper once on his crack machine and it was too painful to climb bare handed. You want to be able to use it without gloves. You'll enjoy it a lot more.


Wouldn't paint make it too slick?

Agree on avoiding the gloves, for sure...


FLAG
By Sergio P
From Idaho Springs, CO
Nov 8, 2011
World Champion NY Giants logo

mix sand with paint for texture. It shouldn't be worse on your hands then real rock. Over time the sand will fall off and you can choose to repaint if you want.


FLAG
By Stich
From Colorado Springs, Colorado
Nov 8, 2011
Coffee after freezing our asses off near James Peak.

David Horgan wrote:
Wouldn't paint make it too slick? Agree on avoiding the gloves, for sure...


It depends on the paint you use. But try it sanded without paint first to see if you like it.


FLAG
By Darren in Vegas
From Las Vegas, NV
Nov 8, 2011
Skiing around.

A friend of mine glued burlap fabric to the surface of the wood. worked pretty good


FLAG
By BackCountry
From West Point, UT
Nov 8, 2011
Whaaaat?

I'm surprised the hold manufacturers have come out with something yet. Maybe you could research the climbing hold manufacturing process and mold yourself a sweet crack?


FLAG
By KevinCO
From Loveland, CO
Nov 8, 2011

I used thin pieces of sandstone (scraps from the quarry). Use the highest rated contruction glue you can find and clamp or weight to increase the strength while it is drying.

If you use stone, grind the outside edges a little.


FLAG
By JesseT
From Portland, OR
Nov 8, 2011
25' drop...wheeeeee!

I'd go with shale or slate. Both are pretty easy to come by due to their use in flooring/decking(not the bad kind). I feel like shale has a pretty average texture as far as rock goes, and slate's naturally flat and is a bit smoother for more of a challenge.


FLAG
By Brian in SLC
Nov 8, 2011
Climbing in Smuggler's Notch

Best simulated cracks for training I've seen are just bare wood.

Yeah, its slick, so, won't tear your hands up and you're forced develope good technique. Using a grippy surface defeats the purpose, IMHO.


FLAG
By D@n
From Boulder, CO
Nov 8, 2011
Head full of lead. Photo by Frosty Weller

I've built a crack machine hangboard that I surfaced by wrapping the boards with climbing tape. I wrapped the boards instead of just putting strips on as it tends to stay on better. The more you overlap, the better. Also, use the good curity kendall tape as it has the best adhesive. This type of surface is friendly on your skin, gives you extra grip, and is cheap and easy to install.

I think I still have my hangboard but I don't use it. I'd probably give it away for a 6 pack. If you want to be able to master fist jams it's perfect. Hand jams are problematic in narrow doorways.

Good luck -
Dan


FLAG
By Dana Bartlett
From CT
Nov 8, 2011

Go to Supertopo and email Ed Hartouni. I believe that he and his frineds use one frequently; he's a friendly guy and and will certainly respond.


FLAG
By Kent Pease
From Littleton, Colorado
Nov 8, 2011

Get a good thick paint and add grit. Hardware stores carry a fine sand that is normally added to paint for concrete steps that works well. If you use normal latex paint it will last OK, but if you want good long term performance then use a marine or epoxy paint.

Now for my unsolicited 2 cents: With a decent friction factor inside the crack by making it rough, you may learn to finesse you jams rather than using brute strength if the crack is smooth and slippery.

Good luck


FLAG
By Finn the Human
From The Land of Ooo
Nov 8, 2011
Mathematical!

I heard about some guy using ceramic tile in his crack machine. Dunno how it really worked out, but it's another option I suppose.


FLAG
By DrApnea
From Salt Lake City, UT
Nov 8, 2011

Let's see some pics


FLAG
By JoeR
From Eugene, OR
Nov 8, 2011

+1 for bare wood, no gloves


FLAG
By Bill Duncan
From Jamestown, CO
Nov 9, 2011
Leading the 3rd pitch of West Side Story.

I used garage floor paint with sanded grit mixed in. Available at the local big box stores. Seems to work well.


FLAG
By Will S
From Joshua Tree
Nov 9, 2011

Bare wood lightly sanded.

Painted is too slick. And since the entire purpose is to develop crushing jam strength, while avoiding abrasion/gobies, any sand/rock etc for added texture is a detraction, not a bonus. People add sand because they paint and with plain paint it's way too slick. But sand in the paint blows ass, parts of it crumbles off and it isn't nice on bare hands.

Tape? Surely you're kidding? That'll be nice after a few months when the glue is bleeding through the surface of the tape and it's like climbing a flypaper crack.

One more thought...if you are building a little thing for hangs, don't bother with adjustable, just make side-by-side cracks at different fixed sizes so you can work multiple sizes without having to mess with adjusting it. Suggest 7/8", 1", 1 1/8", 1 1/4", 1 1/2", and fist.


FLAG
By D@n
From Boulder, CO
Nov 9, 2011
Head full of lead. Photo by Frosty Weller

Will S wrote:
Tape? Surely you're kidding? That'll be nice after a few months when the glue is bleeding through the surface of the tape and it's like climbing a flypaper crack.


Have you tried it? The tape actually doesn't bleed glue at all. If anything, the tape gets drier. At any rate, if you climb the same crack for more than a few months without being a Jedi at it, you're going to need more than a crack machine to get better.


FLAG
By NickMartel
From Tucson, Arizona
Nov 9, 2011

I did one with sand and paint. It is really hard on the hands to the point that you don't want to use it without taping hands. I would go with just coarsely sanded wood or if you NEED to add a surface gluing on slate/flagstone (sandstone) or any thin flat stone would work I guess. You can always add texture later but it is hard(er)to take it off. If you are just trying to make a crack hangboard +1 on making a couple side by side with fixed sizes. Do it so that for example the right hand piece of wood for the 3/4" is the left hand side for 1", ect...


FLAG
By Optimistic
From New Paltz
Nov 9, 2011

Thanks to everyone for the replies! I guess I can start with the bare wood and build up from there if that doesn't work for me.

Cheers,
David


FLAG
By Geoff Bindeman
Nov 9, 2011
jugging pitch 1 leaning tower yosemite

Instead of sand in the paint, you could try a little crushed walnut shell. It is commercially available for just such a purpose (Adding a non-slip texture to painted or coated floors) It might be a little friendlier to the hands.


FLAG
By Dave Alie
From Golden, CO
Nov 9, 2011
Photo Credit: The talented Pete Garceau

anyone want to post up some photos of their crack simulators? Never done it and would be interested to see


FLAG
By rock_fencer
From Columbia, SC
Nov 9, 2011
Myself placing a a blue/yellow offset MC to protect between Bolt 2/3 just post crux . <br /> <br />Picture credit goes to eric Singleton, and many thanks to Josh Bagget for the great belay.

Dave Alie wrote:
anyone want to post up some photos of their crack simulators? Never done it and would be interested to see



A friend of mine built this though i'm not sure what he does with it.

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/phU9r6_Si6mT5JRrCk39-w>>>

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/OtF1YaQRLmLjXK8214T4ig>>>


FLAG
By JCM
From Henderson, NV
Nov 9, 2011

David Horgan wrote:
Thanks to everyone for the replies! I guess I can start with the bare wood and build up from there if that doesn't work for me. Cheers, David


This sounds like a pretty sensible solution.


FLAG


Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
Page 1 of 1.