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Best multi-pitch/general trad climbing book?
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By someDuder
From Montreal, QC
Oct 9, 2012
Sasquatches are real!

Hi,

I've been climbing sport for a few years (mostly single pitch, but some 5 and under multi-pitches), and trad for about a year. Aside from the basics I'm mostly self-taught, and because of that there are a whole bunch of gaps in my knowledge, from rope-management to route and trip preparations, to even some anchor building. Mountain Project has been really great for that, but I'd like to get a book that will be a little more concise and comprehensive on things all leaders should know before pushing themselves. I've heard of a few on here, but am wondering which would best cover what I'm looking for.

Thanks!

PS: I probably don't have the patience, or pack room, to pick up more than one.


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By Larry S
Oct 9, 2012
The wife and I road-trippin on the Connie.

I can't comment on the best, but below are the ones I own.

This is a good book by Craig Luebben. I has a little more depth and focus solely on climbing than F.o.t.H below.

This is like the bible of everything you can do in the mountains. If you only own one book, this is probably the one. It's easily twice as thick as the one above. Everything from rock climbing, ice climbing, backpacking, glacier travel...

This is a thin little book but a great how to on constructing anchors for traditional and sport climbing.


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By steven sadler
From SLC, UT
Oct 9, 2012

Climbing Anchors by John Long, Bob Gaines. I read this when I was starting to trad climb and felt it helped me out a lot. I tried reading Freedom of the Hills but it is so broad that I couldn't do it. If you are already climbing sport and want to learn how to place gear and do gear anchors this is definately the book you want to read. It's only 10 bucks on Amazon.


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By ChaseLeoncini
From San Diego, California
Oct 9, 2012
El Cajon Mtn. Leonids. 5.9.

John Longs and Bob Gaines books are great. Wish they were a little more in depth on belay anchor rope management though.


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By michaeltarne
Oct 9, 2012

I like Luebben's book a lot more than Long's.


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By someDuder
From Montreal, QC
Oct 9, 2012
Sasquatches are real!

Thanks for all the reccommendations!

Would you guys say The Freedom of the Hills is as comprehensive as the other books when it comes to rock?


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By Jfriday1
From Denver, CO
Oct 9, 2012
TR

I'm in the same boat, self taught climber (Trad, Sport), I have at least 6 different books, I'd say buy as many of the recommended books as you can and take the time to read and re-read the books.

It pays off to develop the patience to learn the info in the books and have a collection that you can go back to when you feel its time to learn a new trick. One book is not enough. I have all the books listed in this thread so far.


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By ChaseLeoncini
From San Diego, California
Oct 9, 2012
El Cajon Mtn. Leonids. 5.9.

Jfriday1 wrote:
I'm in the same boat, self taught climber (Trad, Sport), I have at least 6 different books, I'd say buy as many of the recommended books as you can and take the time to read and re-read the books. It pays off to develop the patience to learn the info in the books and have a collection that you can go back to when you feel its time to learn a new trick. One book is not enough. I have all the books listed in this thread so far.


+1


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By Kilroywashere!
From Harrisonburg, Virginia
Oct 9, 2012
Kilroy

rope management and route finding stuff?

look at a big wall book. has great info on everything, plus some tricks that will help you become even more efficient.

i have the long/middendorf and the red mountaineer press one, both are really good. worth checking out for sure


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By Ian Stewart
Oct 9, 2012

For anchor building and pro placement, I've been through Leubben's book a number of times: www.amazon.com/Rock-Climbing-Anchors-Comprehensive-Mountaine>>>

Another book that I've gone through and has some very useful information is the Climbing Self Rescue book. Sure, things nomally go fine, but when s**t hits the fan you need to know what to do. It could save your life (or somebody elses, for that matter): www.amazon.com/Climbing-Self-Rescue-Improvising-Mountaineers>>>

someDuder wrote:
PS: I probably don't have the patience, or pack room, to pick up more than one.


Why would ever you need to carry it in your pack? The idea is you read and practice in the safety of your home so that you don't need the book when you're climbing. As for patience, safety isn't something you should be too busy for. Especially when you're climbing multi-pitch and not only yours but also your partners life will be in your hands.


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By mattm
From TX
Oct 9, 2012
Grande Grotto

someDuder wrote:
Thanks for all the reccommendations! Would you guys say The Freedom of the Hills is as comprehensive as the other books when it comes to rock?


NO. FOTH is a nice overall book but the Leubben and Long/Gaines books are FAR better in terms of multi-pitch trad etc


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By Scott McMahon
From Boulder, CO
Oct 9, 2012
Bocan

mattm wrote:
NO. FOTH is a nice overall book but the Leubben and Long/Gaines books are FAR better in terms of multi-pitch trad etc


I like Luebben's book best. Freedom of the Hills is a very comprehensive "bible" of all things climbing.

This is a good overview book as well that mixes tech with application.

www.amazon.com/Traditional-Lead-Climbing-Climbers-Taking/dp/>>>


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By Larry S
Oct 9, 2012
The wife and I road-trippin on the Connie.

someDuder wrote:
Thanks for all the reccommendations! Would you guys say The Freedom of the Hills is as comprehensive as the other books when it comes to rock?


F.o.t.H is like an encyclopedia, it has a broad scope but not as much depth on each topic. If all you want is rock, get a book dedicated to it.


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By someDuder
From Montreal, QC
Oct 9, 2012
Sasquatches are real!

Thanks again for the info. The reason why I'm going to be sticking to 1 book for now is that I will be travelling a bunch for the next month or more, and want to be able to learn some stuff on the way.

I'm definitely intersted in self-rescue too, but I guess I'll have to save that read for another time.


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By todd w
Oct 9, 2012

My vote is for John Long's "Rock climbing anchors"

Since anchor building is dependent on the quality of your gear placements, the book has a huge section devoted to that.


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By Superclimber
Oct 9, 2012

I agree with much of what's already been said.

1. Craig Luebban's Rock Climbing Anchors is the best one on my shelf and the best one that I've seen.

2. I don't care much for John Long's writing style. But he has a small pocket size book on anchors that is great for getting a second perspective.

3. Freedom Of The Hills is good for general knowledge and it covers lots and lots of topics. But it often lacks detail. I wouldn't rely on it for anchor building and rope management stuff. It's better for stuff like navigation or laying systems.

You're gonna die;)


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By Dan Felix
Oct 9, 2012

If you get the Long book, make sure it is the 2nd edition and not the first!


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By Scott McMahon
From Boulder, CO
Oct 9, 2012
Bocan

Dan Felix wrote:
If you get the Long book, make sure it is the 2nd edition and not the first!


You might miss the equallette with the first edition! :o)


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By bearbreeder
Oct 9, 2012



www.amazon.com/Alpine-Climbing-Techniques-Mountaineers-Outdo>>>

excellent book with multi tips ... even if yr not doing alpine ...


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