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Beginner Trad Rack
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By gskis
Jun 15, 2011

Hey all,

Ive been lurking here for a while and done some searches to try to figure this out but i couldnt figure much out. I'm 17 and absolutely love climbing. Ive been considering getting a trad rack but dont really know what to get. Being 17 I'm about as broke as it gets so its something i will be slowly building up. So first question is it possible to have a completely passive rack? If so what would that look like? Basically what would be the best trad rack I could get for the least amount of money?

Thanks for any advice!


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By FrankPS
From Atascadero, CA
Jun 15, 2011

The "pioneers" in climbing only had passive protection, so you could start with that. A couple of sets of nuts, some runners and quickdraws could get you up most routes.

I assume/hope you are getting some good instruction from an experienced climber?

A job would also go a long ways toward buying some cams.

Good luck. You will eventually get the whole shebang.


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By Evan Sanders
From Westminster, CO
Jun 15, 2011
Flaming Pumpkin

Best for the least? That seems counterintuitive. A solid rack for not a whole lot of money? Get a rack of forged friends. Bomber, cheap (because most are used), and absolutely the most durable cam you will ever buy. It'll probably last you until you can't climb anymore. Until you get it stuck somewhere.


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By Tim Zander
Jun 15, 2011

I climbed on completely passive for awhile, get some used nuts and hexes for very cheap. Buy a few(4 or 5) used cams for about 20-30 a piece(I think with nuts, go purple through gold c4 for a good range). Get webbing and tie your own slings, some used biners and a few QDs.

Oh, and most important, make friends with experienced leaders who already have somewhat of a rack and climb with them for awhile until you figure out what you want for your own rack


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By Jesse Davidson
From san diego, ca
Jun 15, 2011
n cascades <br />

when I first started, I bought a bunch of cheap cams but didn't really like them and eventually replaced them. My advice would be to buy even just a few cams, maybe a .75, 1, and 2 rather than more cams that will get retired soon anyway. Also, a used camalot for $35 is a better deal than a brand new cheapo for $40.


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By Stich
From Colorado Springs, Colorado
Jun 15, 2011
Coffee after freezing our asses off near James Peak.

Jesse Davidson wrote:
when I first started, I bought a bunch of cheap cams but didn't really like them and eventually replaced them. My advice would be to buy even just a few cams, maybe a .75, 1, and 2 rather than more cams that will get retired soon anyway. Also, a used camalot for $35 is a better deal than a brand new cheapo for $40.


This is the best advice by far. I too got some inferior old twin axle Camalots and quickly replaced them with used single stem ones. Also definitely save up and get those cams. It will make your first leads on your rack a hell of a lot less horrifying. Heh.


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By gskis
Jun 15, 2011

This is all awesome advice! Thanks so much! If you were me, what would be your rack? Sizes of nuts and hexes and what not as well as how many of each as well as cams?


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By shoo
From Boston, Massachusetts
Jun 15, 2011
Rock wars, Red River Gorge

gskis wrote:
This is all awesome advice! Thanks so much! If you were me, what would be your rack? Sizes of nuts and hexes and what not as well as how many of each as well as cams?


Ask people specific to the area in which you will be climbing, and climb on other local's racks until you have a good idea of what I need.

Also, please do not re-hash this thread, which already exists in like a bajillion places all over the internet, all ending in the same conclusion (see above).


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By FrankPS
From Atascadero, CA
Jun 15, 2011

Although certain climbing areas might call for certain types of pro, your best bet is to get a full set of nuts, and a full set of cams, (in Black Diamond, that would be one each in a range from .3 to #3 or #4). Get cams with four "lobes," to start. You can get the TCU's (three cam units) later. A set of cams and a set of nuts is versatile and will be sufficient for most climbing. Then, you can buy a second set of cams to have "doubles" of each size. Additionally, you will need some shoulder-length runners and some quickdraws. And many carabiners.

Here is an example of a set of nuts:

www.rei.com/product/696253/black-diamond-wired-stopper-set

Again, the most important thing is to have good instruction. Climb safely.


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By Matt N
From Santa Barbara, CA
Jun 15, 2011
OTL

gskis wrote:
Basically what would be the best trad rack I could get for the least amount of money? Thanks for any advice!


If you have money now, or can work this summer and pay back whoever's credit card you use - you should buy today, as alssports has gear going new for used prices (just review the FS section and see).

.75 c4 $39
#1 c4 $42
#2 c4 $45
shoulder length nylon slings $3.24ea
$3.89 neutrinos
$5.19 lockers
$5.84 anchor runner
$9 quickdraws
$58.49 stoppers

Bare bones trad rack, brand new BD gear for ~$296. This assumes 4 runners, 12 neutrinos (racking and trad draws w/ one spare), 2 lockers, 6 quickdraws (for nut placements add/delete if you already have some from sport). I prob left something out, but this should do you fairly well.
You could put this together used, but likely would not save any money. Add some TCUs for small stuff or whatever else you can afford/borrow for now, as this sale is insanely low. Used prices for new gear. Now go buy before it sells out and you're climbing with rigid friends and hexes.


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By Josh Olson
From madison, wisconsin
Jun 15, 2011
Looking at a 5.7 crack with Nick

What are you planning on doing? A leading rack is way more filled in than a toproping rack.

Also, if you know what climbs you like to do, like crack size, you can focus on that size. I know I prefer hand cracks over thin or really wide cracks, so I have a doubles in that range.

Last thing I would remind you, when you start off leading, you are going to place a lot more gear than you would if you were experienced and confiendt in your abilities. I place less gear now than I did a year ago, that is for sure.


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By gskis
Jun 15, 2011

I am just getting into trad climbing so I am not too sure what type I will be doing. My guess would be lead as opposed to top roping? I climb in Washington so mainly basalt and granite.


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