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Beacon Rock

Routes Sorted
L to R R to L Alpha
3rd Rail, The T 
Beacon Rock Bouldering 
Bears in Heat T 
Blood, Sweat, and Smears T 
Blownout T 
Borderline T,S 
Cruisin' T 
Dorian's Dilemma T 
Excalibur T,S 
Fear of Flying T 
Fireballs T 
Flying Dutchman T 
Flying Swallow T 
Free for All T 
Free For All, Direct T 
Free for Some T 
Fresh Squeeze T 
Gitmo Love Machine T 
Head Case T,S 
Jill's Thrill T 
Link-up: Free for All/Dod's Jam/Dastardly Crack T 
Little Wing T 
Lost Warriors T 
Norseman, The S 
Old Warriors Never Die S 
Pipeline T 
Right Gull T 
Rise Up T 
Siege Tactics T 
Sky Fishermen (free variation of Grunge Book) T,S 
South East Corner T 
Stone Rodeo S 
Wild Turkeys T 
Windsurfer T 
Windwalker T 
Winter Delight T,S 
Young Warriors T 
Unsorted Routes:
Rest Day:
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Beacon Rock  


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Location: 45.6272, -122.0207 View Map  Incorrect?
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Administrators: Nate Ball, Peter Franzen, Kristine Hoffman (sitewide)
Submitted By: Peter Franzen on Jan 22, 2006
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Seasonal Raptor Closure MORE INFO >>>

A NOTE ON THE LOCATION OF THIS AREA 

I am well aware that Beacon Rock is in Washington. However, due to its proximity to the Portland metro area I, along with other members of the Portland climbing community, have decided that it would be a better fit in the Oregon section of this site.

Description 

A lone 850í basalt monolith that sits prominently in the spectacular Columbia Gorge, Beacon Rock is an obvious climbing destination for Portland climbers. Although much of the rock in the gorge is of poor quality Beacon Rock has plenty of solid and steep lines. A handful of boulders are tucked away in the woods below.

The descent off of Beacon Rock is one of the easiest anywhere. An elaborate stainless steel "trail" of platforms and staircases is bolted to the East side of Beacon Rock which makes for an easy hike to the top for tourists, or an easy descent for climbers.

It will make a lot more sense to sort the routes Right to Left in the route listing, since the only climber's trail traverses the wall right to left. Some routes (Fireball, Gitmo, etc.) are on the separate NE face, but are rarely climbed.

Getting There 

The easiest way to reach Beacon Rock is to take State Route 14 29 miles East from Vancouver, Washington. Alternatively, you can take I-84 East from Portland and cross The Bridge of the Gods (have some change handy, as itís a toll bridge), and then West on SR 14 to the park.

Climbing Season



Weather station 3.8 miles from here

37 Total Routes

['4 Stars',9],['3 Stars',22],['2 Stars',5],['1 Star',1],['Bomb',0]
['<=5.6',0],['5.7',1],['5.8',4],['5.9',2],['5.10',14],['5.11',7],['5.12',6],['5.13',2],['>=5.14',0],['',0],['<=V1',0],['V2-3',0],['V4-5',1],['V6-7',0],['V8-9',0],['V10-11',0],['V12-13',0],['>=V14',0]

The Classics

Mountain Project's determination of some of the classic, most popular, highest rated routes for Beacon Rock:
South East Corner   5.7 5a 15 V+ 13 MVS 4b     Trad, 5 pitches, 600'   
Cruisin'   5.8 5b 16 VI- 15 HVS 4c     Trad, 1 pitch, 100'   
Little Wing   5.8 5b 16 VI- 15 HVS 4c     Trad, 1 pitch, 80'   
Young Warriors   5.9 5c 17 VI 17 HVS 5a     Trad, 4 pitches, 400'   
Jill's Thrill   5.9 5c 17 VI 17 HVS 5a     Trad, 3 pitches, 300'   
Free For All, Direct   5.10a 6a 18 VI+ 18 E1 5a     Trad   
Winter Delight   5.10b 6a+ 19 VII- 19 E2 5b     Trad, Sport, 1 pitch, 60'   
Blownout   5.10b 6a+ 19 VII- 19 E2 5b     Trad, 3 pitches, 220'   
Windsurfer   5.10b 6a+ 19 VII- 19 E2 5b     Trad, 1 pitch, 105'   
Flying Dutchman   5.10b 6a+ 19 VII- 19 E2 5b     Trad, 1 pitch, 80'   
Rise Up   5.10c 6b 20 VII 20 E2 5b     Trad, 1 pitch, 90'   
Link-up: Free for All/Dod's Jam/Dastardly Crack   5.10c 6b 20 VII 20 E2 5b     Trad, 4 pitches, 400'   
Free for Some   5.11a 6c 22 VII+ 22 E3 5c PG13     Trad, 1 pitch, 180'   
Pipeline   5.11b 6c 23 VIII- 23 E3 5c     Trad, 1 pitch, 60'   
Windwalker   5.11d 7a 24 VIII 25 E5 6a     Trad, 1 pitch, 90'   
Browse More Classics in Beacon Rock

Featured Route For Beacon Rock
1st pitch of Blownout

Blownout 5.10b 6a+ 19 VII- 19 E2 5b  OR : Beacon Rock
Beautiful long perfect dihedral after some interesting face work. P1, climb Blownout direct 5.9 (hard/technical for 5.9) start just uphill from tunnel #1, thin flake, then seam and right-facing thin flake w 2 or 3 pitons to bolted belay. P2, Up and left then up hand crack to belay "in a protected corner beneath the great upper dihedral." P3. 120 feet of dihedral. Stems, chimney moves, lieback, all you ever wanted from a 5.10A dihedral!!...[more]   Browse More Classics in OR

Photos of Beacon Rock Slideshow Add Photo
The mostly forbidden north and east faces of Beacon rock from the parking lot.
BETA PHOTO: The mostly forbidden north and east faces of Beaco...

Comments on Beacon Rock Add Comment
Show which comments
By Karsten
From: Sacramento, CA
Jan 23, 2006
You might also add that the east face is currently closed to climbing.

The last few years have seen a revitalization of climbing and stewardship at beacon rock. There has been extensive anchor restoration, route cleaning, and new route development in the last few years. This summer there are plans to reclaim several more once popular routes of foliage and debris.
By Eric Schnepel
From: Portland
Sep 12, 2011
I'm in!
By Kenny Allen
Oct 7, 2011
the bolts, hangers, and slings on jill's thrill are in great condition and in NO way need replacing - perfectly safe. active maintenance of the slings and anchors at beacon rock occur as it is needed, and the slings presently in place, while faded, have suffered no loss in strength. i use these anchors several times per week and i have not yet seen a set of slings in need of replacing(or bolts. or hangers). if i had, i would have changed them myself.

i feel it should be noted that joe healy is NOT an official spokesperson for climbing at beacon rock. i do not want to seem defamatory toward him in any way, but he speaks only for himself and frequently acts without consulting any of the regulars who climb at beacon on a daily basis during the busiest climbing months. posting here, on an internet forum, is NOT a substitute for consulting the regular climbers (the locals). by comparision to my own usage, joe healy is NOT a local at beacon rock, and just because he says it doesn't mean it is coming from a concensus... in fact, this is rarely the case.

all that aside, his points on cleaning are hit and miss. trundling should NEVER occur during the peak climbing days - so on the weekends between july and october - because those are the busiest times on the rock and at the base when the crowds are building up around the start of the se corner and dod's jam/free for all. during the week, cleaning and trundling is much more acceptable, though, if there is excessive cleaning requiring the removal of a lot of material then please inform the rangers of your plans and post a sign at the trailhead to inform others of the circumstances. rocks are falling off of beacon all the time and while it seems as though there is a genuine concern for falling rocks routinely hitting the railroad it should be said that the railroad monitors this stretch of track VERY frequently, and coordination with the railroad for "track closures" around beacon rock is, in reality, just a waste of their time - they know the instant a rock comes close to the tracks (a series of wires are strung for quite a distance along side the tracks, adjacent to the rock, and if any of them break a signal is sent to a crew to come investigate the tracks - they break if they are struck by large enough rocks and the smaller rocks don't faze the trains or tracks).

mainly, the point i want to be emphasized is that communication with the most frequent users is the most important (not to mention respectful) thing to consider. as long as you are talking with the locals then word of what is going on at beacon rock is being circulated to those who climb the rock the most. yes, this is a public park on state land and everyone has the right to use it. but those who come once a season to climb(or less than seven times in the seven months it is open) should not be making decisions without talking to locals about the issue, first, since they have less stake in the climbing out there. i don't want to sound like there is a group that isn't welcome at beacon rock, because everyone is welcome as long as they can be honest, respectful of others, and willing to be open to the opinions and viewpoints of others. unfortunately, these traits are not found in all those who climb at beacon rock, but the vast majority of us are willing to listen to everyone, while certain folks are just too resistant to this idea.

thanks and hope to see y'all out here!
By Healyje
Jul 10, 2012
"Kenny Allen------------------------------------
Active maintenance of the slings and anchors at beacon rock occur as it is needed...
-----------------------------------------------
"

Yes, so far by me and since 2005 I've replaced the 68 most used two-bolt anchors and maintained them since all at my own time and expense.


"Kenny Allen------------------------------------
I feel it should be noted that joe healy is NOT an official spokesperson for climbing at beacon rock... i do not want to seem defamatory toward him in any way, but he speaks only for himself and frequently acts without consulting any of the regulars who climb at beacon on a daily basis during the busiest climbing months.
-----------------------------------------------
"

Now that would be an understatement and I would in no way want to be associated in any formal way with anyone else with regard to climbing at Beacon. So long as the 'regulars' remain hysterically focused on a Peregrine closure that is entirely consistent with every other Access Fund accepted raptor closure I would say there is little common ground. The only way to potentially modify the closure would be as a policy experiment via an established working relationship based on mutual respect and trust between 'regulars', the WSP and the WDFW who imposes the closure ( which, ironically, would be Kenny's employer) - unfortunately no such relationship exists and until it does there isn't even the possibility of a change to the closure.


"Kenny Allen------------------------------------
joe healy is NOT a local at beacon rock
-----------------------------------------------


You keep telling yourself that and with enough local fairy dust it will no doubt become as real as any other popular trackside delusion.


"Kenny Allen------------------------------------
All that aside, his points on cleaning are hit and miss. trundling should NEVER occur during the peak climbing days - so on the weekends between july and october - because those are the busiest times on the rock and at the base when the crowds are building up around the start of the se corner and dod's jam/free for all. during the week, cleaning and trundling is much more acceptable, though, if there is excessive cleaning requiring the removal of a lot of material then please inform the rangers of your plans and post a sign at the trailhead to inform others of the circumstances.
-----------------------------------------------


Actually, there's essentially no reason to ever trundle while climbing out there - just stash it off to the side and it will likely get cleaned up in one of the pre-open work sessions. If something is dangerous then, as Kenny says, post up on the board and contact the BRSP staff (and if the office is closed please call and leave a message at 509#427#8265). There are zero circumstances where the BRSP is going to want you to follow through with "your plan" to do any big trundling without BRSP staff involvement, closing down the trails, and having folks posted at the closed trailheads and spotters on the tracks, all with radios working in a coordinated and cooperative manner.


"Kenny Allen------------------------------------
rocks are falling off of beacon all the time and while it seems as though there is a genuine concern for falling rocks routinely hitting the railroad it should be said that the railroad monitors this stretch of track VERY frequently, and coordination with the railroad for "track closures" around beacon rock is, in reality, just a waste of their time - they know the instant a rock comes close to the tracks (a series of wires are strung for quite a distance along side the tracks, adjacent to the rock, and if any of them break a signal is sent to a crew to come investigate the tracks - they break if they are struck by large enough rocks and the smaller rocks don't faze the trains or tracks).
-----------------------------------------------


Well, that's a bit wide of the mark. The last head ranger stated emphatically that the railroad is the main threat to climbing at Beacon and any track closure which could be tied to climbers action would result immediate repercussions the WSP and BRSP would be hard-pressed to respond to in our defense given the clout the railroad has compared to the WSP. That has been the explicit reason for the pre-open surveys and pre-open work sessions several of which have been in coordinated with dispatched railroad crews and involved slowing and stopping of trains on one of the busiest stretches of track on the west coast. And it's dead serious business to the railroad guys who have clearly stated they don't like surprises and that if anything big needs to come down for any reason then it should come down in a controlled fashion with the tracks secured and their crews on site to monitor the action, repair broken safety wire and run an inspection truck over the stretch to verify to the train controllers at center that the track is clear and ok to resume traffic at speed.

And it's even a stickier issue after WSDOT miscalculated the length of time their RT. 14 blasting work down the road from Beacon would stop rail traffic last year. Instead of hours it took days and the railroad guys were pissed enough to rip assholes up in Olympia and let the BRSP locally know that any future stoppages / work sessions would now have to be reviewd and scheduled three weeks out which could be a serious problem on trying to open in any year with a big rock fall clearing issue like 2010 was. After the WSDOT fiasco we could easily see a three week delay in opening after another similar bad winter event. Again, these are the last people on earth to try and dismiss, second guess, or underestimate.


"Kenny Allen------------------------------------
i don't want to sound like there is a group that isn't welcome at beacon rock, because everyone is welcome as long as they can be honest, respectful of others, and willing to be open to the opinions and viewpoints of others. unfortunately, these traits are not found in all those who climb at beacon rock, but the vast majority of us are willing to listen to everyone, while certain folks are just too resistant to this idea.
-----------------------------------------------


Well, you sound like you sound and if there were ever good advice then that bolded part would be it as you dudes really need to start practicing before you preach.


[ ** Side or off-topic comment. Do you really need to post this here? ** / Sadly, given the factual misinformation alone - apparently so... ]