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By Kyler R
From SLC
Jul 20, 2014
Castleton Tower
Hey there, I am very unfamiliar when it comes to places to teach a brand new person the basics via top rope.

Normally I would set a top rope on lead but I don't think I will be leading with this person first off.

I would prefer suggestions in LCC or BCC that I can set a top rope on easy-ish climbs. 5.7-5.8+ range.

-Dogwood
-SLC Slips, can you set top ropes here?
-
-
-

Thanks for all your input.

FLAG
By rging
From Salt Lake City, Ut
Jul 21, 2014
CoR
Dogwood has the easiest walk up and I have top roped the 5.8-5.9 climbs on the left with a little effort. You can top rope several climbs at Parlays since you walk in from above. You can also top rope at the Slips but I find it to be more work than the other two.

FLAG
By Kai Larson
From Sandy, Utah
Jul 21, 2014
Tour Ronde North Face
Dogwood also has the advantage of having shade in the morning, and its position right next to the creek also keeps it very cool.

You need to get there early, however, as it gets crowded.

FLAG
By Kyler R
From SLC
Jul 21, 2014
Castleton Tower
I'd really love to stay away from the slips or dogwood since they're shit shows where i often feel compelled to teach others with their atrocious habits than the person I'd rather be teaching.

I've heard there is TR at Lisa Falls? I've not ever climbed there, any beta on their with the TR situation?

FLAG
By Brendan N. (grayhghost)
From Salt Lake City, Utah
Jul 21, 2014
I would recommend The Red Rock for beginners because it has more positive holds.

FLAG
By Eric Chabot
From Thetford Ctr, VT
Jul 21, 2014
Kyler R wrote:
I'd really love to stay away from the slips or dogwood since they're shit shows


At risk of hijacking this thread and turning it into a flame fest, I would argue that these 'shit show' crags might be the best place for this type of activity.

Typically when I have done this sort of thing, or seen others doing it, a single party occupies a route for a loooooooooooong time. This is better/more respectfully done in the n00b zones such as the slips or dogwood. Once your partner/s are safe, competent, and efficient, they can graduate to other crags (i.e. challenge buttress) where they will not create a hazard (or inconvenience) for more experienced climbers and everyone will have a more enjoyable time, n00bs and intermediates alike... The reason these places are blown out is because they are perfect for the sort of activity you describe.

We hiked up to the Coffin one time only to find a new aid-climber sewing up the crack as his first-ever aid climb. We were bummed that they had picked a classic, moderate free route for this activity (but hey we should have gotten up earlier). Obviously everyone has the right to climb everywhere on public land, but sometimes a bit of discretion on the part of a trip leader can go a long way in helping everyone accomplish what they want without hogging what is becoming a limited resource as the population of climbers grows and grows.

Ambush wall is really good for beginners as well, nice and shady with buckety holds. Not sure the TR access, but it has all the romantic ambiance you could wish for and is way less crowded than the slips or dogwood. The Red Rock is the best crag IMO of the places mentioned in this thread but this time of year it will be the hottest and has by FAR the gnarliest approach (pretty tough by sport-climbing standards).

FLAG
By Kyler R
From SLC
Jul 21, 2014
Castleton Tower
Eric Chabot wrote:
At risk of hijacking this thread and turning it into a flame fest, I would argue that these 'shit show' crags might be the best place for this type of activity. Typically when I have done this sort of thing, or seen others doing it, a single party occupies a route for a loooooooooooong time. This is better/more respectfully done in the n00b zones such as the slips or dogwood. Once your partner/s are safe, competent, and efficient, they can graduate to other crags (i.e. challenge buttress) where they will not create a hazard (or inconvenience) for more experienced climbers and everyone will have a more enjoyable time, n00bs and intermediates alike... The reason these places are blown out is because they are perfect for the sort of activity you describe. We hiked up to the Coffin one time only to find a new aid-climber sewing up the crack as his first-ever aid climb. We were bummed that they had picked a classic, moderate free route for this activity (but hey we should have gotten up earlier). Obviously everyone has the right to climb everywhere on public land, but sometimes a bit of discretion on the part of a trip leader can go a long way in helping everyone accomplish what they want without hogging what is becoming a limited resource as the population of climbers grows and grows. Ambush wall is really good for beginners as well, nice and shady with buckety holds. Not sure the TR access, but it has all the romantic ambiance you could wish for and is way less crowded than the slips or dogwood. The Red Rock is the best crag IMO of the places mentioned in this thread but this time of year it will be the hottest and has by FAR the gnarliest approach (pretty tough by sport-climbing standards).



I fully understand what you are saying. By far learning to aid on Coffin is bad form, unless you do it by headlamp after everyone is gone.

I really have a disdain for huge groups and multiple unused ropes. HOWEVER, as I said I do not top rope often at all. I know of dogwood and slips but I am simply looking for other areas where the chains are accessible from the top as I do have an urge for a productive session so we can go to the better sport areas reasonably soon and progressing to following trad where everyone is more chill and friendly and ethical with all the joys of mellow trad and alpine climbing.

FLAG
By Daniel Winder
Jul 22, 2014
I'd check out Beachball in BCC. Gear anchors=no crowds. Short routes mean easier communication and more time working on skills. There is 0 approach in low water and the streamside climbing is pleasant.

FLAG
 
By Kyler R
From SLC
Jul 22, 2014
Castleton Tower
Daniel Winder wrote:
I'd check out Beachball in BCC. Gear anchors=no crowds. Short routes mean easier communication and more time working on skills. There is 0 approach in low water and the streamside climbing is pleasant.


Thanks for informative response that is different than the typical TR spots. I will have to go check it out. As an added bonus anchor building lessons can be begun as well.

FLAG
By Tim Peterson
Jul 22, 2014
There are 3 top rope climbs at Lisa Falls that I am aware of (Lisa Falls Left, Sweet Spot and Sweet Spot Left). They are to the left of the falls. You can climb around from the base and reach the anchors. They range from 5.8 to 5.10b. Pretty slick at the bottom and decent slab climbing for the area. Easy approach.

There are also several top rope routes at the parking lot of the Mount Olympus trailhead. Unbearable in the evening but great in the morning.

On Ambush wall you can climb around to the top of the climb but would need to lower off the edge to get to the chains.

FLAG
By cdec
From SLC and Moab, ut
Jul 22, 2014
If you are teaching perhaps you should consider knowing how to get a "brand new person" educated and able to belay both, TR and lead, right away, as well as, the ways to manage the risks involved in having a new student belay and climb with you. There are ways to manage the risk of the entire process of getting the rope up, and you back down, that virtually eliminate the need to resort to Troping.

FLAG
By rging
From Salt Lake City, Ut
Jul 22, 2014
CoR
Come to think of it you can top rope at Narcolepsy as well. I believe three routes in the 5.8-5.10a range. Just walk around to the left and up to a somewhat exposed series of chains.

FLAG


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