Login with Facebook
 ADVANCED
Back to climbing shape after a Thru-Hike?
View Latest Posts in This Forum or All Forums
   Page 1 of 1.  
Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
 
 
By Jace Mullen
From Oceanside, Ca
Oct 3, 2012
I was terrified to realize that after four months of hiking (with practically no upper body use) on the PCT that I was having issues on 5.5s the first time I went climbing (and only time sine I finished like a week ago).

I have re-read Mark Twight's "Extreme Alpinism" in order to see what he recommended as far as workouts to get into climbing shape. Sadly, he doesn't offer any suggestions on workouts directed at building an upper body foundation, which I need again.

So besides climbing, what would you recommend as far as workouts and training regimins to get back to climbing at or above the level I was when I left?

FLAG
By kennoyce
From Layton, UT
Oct 3, 2012
Climbing at the Gallery in Red Rocks
Jace Mullen wrote:
I was terrified to realize that after four months of hiking (with practically no upper body use) on the PCT that I was having issues on 5.5s the first time I went climbing (and only time sine I finished like a week ago). I have re-read Mark Twight's "Extreme Alpinism" in order to see what he recommended as far as workouts to get into climbing shape. Sadly, he doesn't offer any suggestions on workouts directed at building an upper body foundation, which I need again. So besides climbing, what would you recommend as far as workouts and training regimins to get back to climbing at or above the level I was when I left?


How about more climbing?

FLAG
By Eric Carlos
From Boulder, CO
Oct 3, 2012
Always wear a helmet.  I had it with me but chose ...
Besides climbing? Resting after climbing. Then more climbing. Rinse and repeat. I would guess that in doing the PCT, you have probably shed a few unnecessary pounds that will benefit you anyway. If you are struggling with 5.5s, then definitely just focus on climbing.

FLAG
By Will S
From Joshua Tree
Oct 3, 2012
Since upper-body doesn't even really come into play on anything under 5.7 or so, I'd say it's more a matter of not having been on rock than anything to do with losing upper body strength.

You're probably lighter with better cardio than before. Just go climbing. Boulder in the gym if you have access to one, but at that level, time on rock is really what you need.

FLAG
By JCM
From Seattle, WA
Oct 3, 2012
I have had several 4-6 month hiatuses from climbing, and I have found that it usually takes me about 6 weeks of climbing regularly (~3 days/week) for me to feel like I am at something resembling good "normal" climbing fitness and ability.

This spring, I had an unfortunate pairing of injuries (knee, shoulder, both of right side, unrelated to each other) that prevented me from getting any excercise for 4 months (early Feb to early June). When I started climbing again in early June, I was in terrible fitness, but by late July (8 weeks) I was in as good a climbing fitness as I had ever been in, and by mid-August I had surpassed that and was in, by far, my best fitness ever.

Notable details to this story are that I was climbing a lot, and that I was climbing in a very physically demanding area (mostly Rifle). I I was climbing less, the comeback would not have been as effective, and if I had not been climbing in such a fitness-oriented place, I would not have gained strength as quickly.

As such, I reccommend doing as much overhanging sport climbing as possible. Gym climbing helps too.

Listen to your body, and take rest days as needed. You may need to tkae rest days more frequently (i.e. day-on-day-off) until you are feeling a bit fitter.

FLAG
By Bobby Treadwell
From Prescott, AZ
Oct 3, 2012
Walking the traverse.
I hiked the AT in 3 months last year and thought I would never get my strength back. It only took a month to get back to where I was at. I did pull-ups and push-ups. A few weeks after that I was stronger than I was prior to my thru-hike.

FLAG
By Jace Mullen
From Oceanside, Ca
Oct 11, 2012
Update: I just joined a bouldering gym because it was super cheap and it is open 24/7 meaning that I can climb WAY more than I would otherwise be able to. My biggest challenge now is finding mid-week partners so I can get out on real rock more.

I've also been swimming and running to help increase overall fitness. We'll see what happens next time I try leading rock. Hopefully good things.

FLAG
By jtmann
From O
Oct 27, 2012
I also live in Oceanside, CA. Where is the 24/7 bouldering gym? I would like to look into it.

FLAG
 
By Ryan Williams
Administrator
From London (sort of)
Oct 27, 2012
El Chorro
Jace Mullen wrote:
Update: I just joined a bouldering gym because it was super cheap and it is open 24/7 meaning that I can climb WAY more than I would otherwise be able to. My biggest challenge now is finding mid-week partners so I can get out on real rock more. I've also been swimming and running to help increase overall fitness. We'll see what happens next time I try leading rock. Hopefully good things.


It sounds to me that your biggest challenge will be to keep from getting injured. Make sure your get a really good warm up before doing ANY bouldering and rest twice as much as you want to.

FLAG
By Mark E Dixon
From Sprezzatura, Someday
Oct 27, 2012
At the BRC
Just to clarify-

Yo Momma'99 wrote:
p.s. just to clarify : sport climbing at a gym is not really climbing ...its TRAINING for climbing, son.


is a silly, elitist, "I'm better than other people" attitude.
Often espoused by people who aren't better at the gym.

FLAG
By Steve M
From MN
Oct 27, 2012
One thing that my partner told me right when I got off the PCT: You know you're not wearing a backpack anymore right?

You're probably struggling on 5.5 cause you're using a bent forward at the waist stance and its killing your footwork. Concentrate on balance and posture, by the time you get those straightened out your upper body strength will be close to back where you need it.

FLAG
By Optimistic
From New Paltz
Nov 20, 2012
Jace Mullen wrote:
I was terrified to realize that after four months of hiking (with practically no upper body use) on the PCT that I was having issues on 5.5s the first time I went climbing (and only time sine I finished like a week ago). I have re-read Mark Twight's "Extreme Alpinism" in order to see what he recommended as far as workouts to get into climbing shape. Sadly, he doesn't offer any suggestions on workouts directed at building an upper body foundation, which I need again. So besides climbing, what would you recommend as far as workouts and training regimins to get back to climbing at or above the level I was when I left?


Not directly related to your question, but people were speculating that you might have lost some weight on the hike: did you? I've always been curious about a big hike like that as a way to drop some poundage...but maybe you didn't have any poundage to drop?

FLAG


Follow replies to this topic? Notify me at the top of web site.
1

Email me.
Page 1 of 1.