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Angel Arch Legal to Climb?
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By tooTALLtim
From Boulder, CO
Jun 19, 2014
Loving it up in the Creek!
So the rules say "Any arch or natural bridge named on the United States Geological Survey 7.5 minute topographical maps covering Arches National Park is closed to climbing year-round."

But Angel Arch is in the Needles District of Canyonlands. So I can climb this legally, yes?

FLAG
By John Wilder
From Las Vegas, NV
Jun 19, 2014
i would contact the offices for Canyonlands and ask- especially since the page you linked noted specifically that the rangers dont like climbers on the arches. Arches National Park policy is irrelevant in this case.

FLAG
By Max Supertramp
Jun 19, 2014
As your attorney, I would recommend against it, especially given your publication of intent.

I advise you to contact the relevant Man and see.

FLAG
By tooTALLtim
From Boulder, CO
Jun 19, 2014
Loving it up in the Creek!
Thanks for the replies! I'll contact the NPS :D

FLAG
By Frosty Weller
From Colorado
Jun 19, 2014
Desert Tower
Please post up what you find out...

FLAG
By J. Hickok
Jun 28, 2014
I always thought it was not allowed based on something I heard in the past...

FLAG
By rich perch
Jun 28, 2014
From the National Park Service website...FYI Angel Arch is in the Salt Creek Archaeological District and is also named on the USGS maps, so it is not currently legal to climb the arch

A9031
March 14, 1995
SUPERINTENDENT'S DIRECTIVE 1995 A-9
To: All Employees, Southeast Utah Group
From: Superintendent, Southeast Utah Group
Subject: Technical Rock Climbing and Canyoneering Policy for Canyonlands National Park
Rock climbing is recognized as a valid recreation use. Some restrictions are necessary to protect park
resources while at the same time providing for their use by the public.
Definitions
Technical Rock Climbing is defined as ascending or descending a rock formation utilizing rock
climbing equipment.
Canyoneering is defined as cross country travel involving occasional ascending or descending a
rock formation utilizing rock climbing equipment.
Free Climbing and Clean Aid Climbing are minimum impact approaches which employ stoppers,
nuts and friends, rather than pitons or bolts, for protection or direct support. These are climbing
aids which are removable and do not damage the rock.
Permits are not required for rock climbing or canyoneering; however, if the climbing or canyoneering
includes an overnight stau, then a backcountry use permit is required and the climbers or canyoneers
are subject to all provisions of the Backcountry Management Plan. The number of available overnight
permits will be subject to the total available for the backcountry zone where the overnight stay occurs.
1. Climbing and canyoneering within Canyonlands National Park shall be either free climbing or
clean aid climbing, except as described below.
2. No new climbing hardware may be left; however, if an existing bolt or other hardware item is
unsafe, it may be replaced. This will limit all climbing to existing routes or new routes not
requiring placement of fixed anchors.
3. Protection may not be placed with the use of a hammer except to replace existing belay and
rappel anchors and bolts on existing routes, or for emergency self rescue.
2
4. If an existing software item (sling, runner, etc.) is unsafe, it may be replaced.
5. Software that is left in place shall match the rock surface in color.
6. The intentional removal of lichen or plants from rock is prohibited.
7. The physical altering of rock faces such as by chiseling, glue reinforcement of existing holds,
and gluing of new holds is prohibited.
8. The use of motorized power drills is prohibited.
9. Technical rock climbing is prohibited in the following areas:
a.The Salt Creek Archaeological District of the Needles District.
b.The detached Horseshoe Canyon unit of the Maze District.
c.Any arch or natural bridge named on the United States Geological Survey 1:62,500 topographic
map of Canyonlands National Park and Vicinity, with the exception of Washer Woman Arch
(Island in the Sky District).
10. Rock climbing, ascending, descending, or traversing an archaeological site or cultural resource
is prohibited. Canyoneering may occur in locations closed to rock climbing, but must occur at
least 300 feet from archaeological or cultural sites.
These requirements are established to minimize alteration of the rock formations and rock art of
Canyonlands National Park. Additional closures to climbing may be made on a short-term basis for
natural, cultural or scenic resource protection. Information on any such closures will be posted at self
registration points and will be provided through all park offices. All closures must be approved by the
Superintendent. Closures of more than six months will be included in this Directive by addendum.
Walter D. Dabney

FLAG
By tooTALLtim
From Boulder, CO
Jun 29, 2014
Loving it up in the Creek!
Thank you Rich and J, I don't want to step on toes and cause access problems.

FLAG
 


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