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Nov 21, 2012
El Cajon Mtn. Leonids. 5.9.
So i've been messing around with the equalette some more and made this...
3-point equalette anchor
3-point equalette anchor

I noticed When i move right the right leg become slack and when i move left the center leg becomes slack, yet always giving me two equal points. Is this correct? Or are all points supposed to be pretty equal at all times and ive somehow messed this up?

PS: I have used the rope but would like more information on this set-up. I'd like to be profficient in every type of anchor.
Thanks in advance.
ChaseLeoncini
From San Diego, California
Joined Aug 22, 2012
145 points
Nov 21, 2012
why are you moving? don't move. S Denny
From Aspen, CO
Joined Sep 25, 2008
24 points
Nov 21, 2012
Grand Teton selfie
That anchor isn't so much self equalizing. Not all anchors will be, or truely need to be. Your goal is to set the anchor in the most likely direction of pull, which is easy to do with your anchor. If you need something to be able to adjust for all ranges, you have to go a different route. Jeremy Riesberg
From Boulder, CO
Joined Jun 3, 2012
22 points
Nov 21, 2012
tanuki
IMHO, if the pieces are bomber, you are fine.

For a better solution, especially if you are swinging leads, use the rope. Here is a good video of one (of many) good solutions.

climbinglife.com/rock-anchorin...

Good on you for wanting to learn about a variety of anchoring methods. There is no "perfect" anchor and different situations require different solutions. FWIW, I almost never use a coordalette in any configuration unless I am climbing in a party of 3. The coordalette works. But, in multi-pitch trad with a party of two, the rope is almost always a better solution.
NC Rock Climber
From The Oven, AKA Phoenix
Joined Dec 6, 2009
121 points
Nov 21, 2012
Summit of Mt. Langley
Chase, I use the Equalette almost exclusively. While learning and analyzing it in my basement I made the same observation (when moving side to side one arm will go slack).

Such is the nature of this anchor.

Details are hard to see in a photo, but it appears to be correctly arranged. When using only one beener at the master point (which I also do), be sure to "magic-x" or sliding-x the two strands. Again, details are hard to spot in the photo.
Justin Tomlinson
From Monrovia, CA
Joined Apr 4, 2010
334 points
Nov 21, 2012
Try with 2 biners, the sliding x may be clutching. Stranger Than Iowa
From ia
Joined Nov 6, 2011
5 points
Nov 21, 2012
new toy
Awesome belay spot, I bet there is even a BBQ close by. Doug Foust
From Henderson, Nevada
Joined Sep 14, 2008
191 points
Nov 22, 2012
El Cajon Mtn. Leonids. 5.9.
Thanks everyone for the advice and info. I do have the "sliding x" method in this particular photo. What ive taken out of this is if you pull 3 pieces toward your direction of pull, yes they will all equalize nearly perfectly, however moving off that direction of pull only will only make one slack, keeping two at 50% load. I guess it would be a fair conclusion to say that this set-up is usually better than the cordelette which doesnt equalize that wel especially off direction of pulll. I guess ill stick to this method and back up the piece that never slacks.
Ps: I like the rope but feel like it takes longer when not swapping leads.
PSS: There is a fat BBQ literally 8" left of where i took the photo. ha
Thanks again everyone!
ChaseLeoncini
From San Diego, California
Joined Aug 22, 2012
145 points
Mar 22, 2013
I'm just trying to learn this myself so correct me if I'm wrong and sorry if this is just nitpicking. Shouldn't the girth hitch on the left sling be done the other way so it isn't pulling back across the sling and amplifying the force at that point?

Also a quick question are those two right biners just clove hitched and is that a generally solid way to connect anything to a biner?
David O
Joined Mar 22, 2013
0 points
Mar 22, 2013
North face of long's.
"self-equalizing" is second priority to redundancy. You can have any number of pieces of protection, but if they are not joined independently to a knot, the system has no redundancy. Meaning: if you cut any single strand in your system, what would happen to the rest of the system? On the right side you rely on a single strand, in the case of a failure in your cordelette you would lose two pieces of protection.

My preferred method is to clip each piece into a bight of rope in the cordelette, bring all three bights together, equalizing the force on the pieces, and tie a single overhand or eight with all three bights. This creates a "masterpoint" (the three loops below the knot) and a "shelf" (the three bights above the knot) to attach into and belay off of.

I'm guessing that you already know this system as it is preferred by many guides.
BWIce
From Carlisle, PA
Joined Oct 20, 2010
30 points
Mar 22, 2013
Jurassic Park
Chase, you're fine. Use whatever method you like best. You don't need to back up the piece on the solitary leg.

But seriously, your biggest problem is the empty cans of Natty Ice strewn across your yard.
coldatom
From Cambridge, MA
Joined Sep 20, 2011
74 points
Mar 22, 2013
Profile Icon
Only complaint I have about the Equalette is the extension if a strand breaks. Other than that, I've climbed on it and it seems quite solid. It's very nice for efficiency IMHO because you can leave it tied and have a fairly bomber anchor that's very fast between pitches. Since we trust the single rope not to break, trusting that a single strand of 6 or 7 mil not to break seems like a pretty safe bet to me. Cale Hoopes
From Sammamish, WA
Joined Nov 23, 2012
10 points
Mar 22, 2013
Out of the blue.  Photo by Mike W.
Cale Hoopes wrote:
Only complaint I have about the Equalette is the extension if a strand breaks. Other than that, I've climbed on it and it seems quite solid. It's very nice for efficiency IMHO because you can leave it tied and have a fairly bomber anchor that's very fast between pitches. Since we trust the single rope not to break, trusting that a single strand of 6 or 7 mil not to break seems like a pretty safe bet to me.


The extension is limited to the distance between your two "sliding knots" which should only be a total of 8 to 10 inches. This will limit the extension less than 10 inches. No big deal.
Greg D
From Here
Joined Apr 5, 2006
961 points
Mar 22, 2013
Epic free solo with a pack on
That anchor is totally lacking in redundancy. If that beam blows you're gonna have some issues buddy! Ben Brotelho
From Albany, NY
Joined May 4, 2011
700 points
Mar 22, 2013
Out of the blue.  Photo by Mike W.
Justin Tomlinson wrote:
(when moving side to side one arm will go slack).


This is precisely one the biggest advantages of the equalette. You are very likely to have at least two arms of the anchor sharing the load. With a cordalette, only a slight change in direction means only on piece will be loaded.
Greg D
From Here
Joined Apr 5, 2006
961 points
Mar 22, 2013
Out of the blue.  Photo by Mike W.
BWIce wrote:
On the right side you rely on a single strand, in the case of a failure in your cordelette you would lose two pieces of protection.


No, this is wrong. If each arm is attached with a clove, as it appears to be, they are independent.
Greg D
From Here
Joined Apr 5, 2006
961 points


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