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 ADVANCED
Carcass Crag
Routes Sorted
L to R R to L Alpha
2-Pitch Route S 
Alternative Power S 
Appalling Travesty S 
Goin' Postal S 
Progress S 
Who's Your Daddy S 
Worthless Stud T,S 

2-Pitch Route 

YDS: 5.10d French: 6b+ Ewbanks: 21 UIAA: VII+ ZA: 21 British: E3 5b

   
Type:  Sport, 1 pitch, 35'
Consensus:  YDS: 5.10d French: 6b+ Ewbanks: 21 UIAA: VII+ ZA: 21 British: E3 5b [details]
FA: Dave Furman and Shane Baron
Page Views: 237
Submitted By: Chris Duca on Aug 3, 2012

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  • Description 

    Another semi-forgettable route, though there is a fun--albeit short--sequence of moves around the 3rd bolt.

    Finish at the shared anchors for "Appalling Travesty".

    Not quite sure why this was given such a name, but I can only speculate that the first ascentionists were having pipe dreams when their drill was humming away.

    Location 

    Second route from the end on the right end.

    Protection 

    3 Bolts


    Comments on 2-Pitch Route Add Comment
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    By Derek Doucet
    Aug 4, 2012

    FA: Dave Furman & Shane Baron

    The name stems from the fact that the route was originally envisioned going to the top of the cliff, but a key block fell out of the roof making the climbing past that point MUCH harder. The FA team's solution was to put an anchor at half height. While this makes for a fun, if short little sport route, it also led to an onslaught of jokes about the "second pitch" above the anchor, bivy sites on a 35' clip-up, etc. As for the grade, most will find it very solid at 10d despite it's modest size.
    By karl vochatzer
    From: Austin, TX
    Jul 31, 2013
    rating: 5.11a 6c 22 VII+ 22 E3 5c

    Enjoyed the crimping up the wall and figuring out the sequence getting to #3. Unfortunately, the bolting scheme seems poor. #1 is too far right (about 2 feet from the neighboring route's #1) and bolt #2 is too far left. This result is a diagonally hanging rope between the two that is right in the middle of the fall zone going up onto the overlap. I got a deep rope burn on the right ankle when I popped off the wall a few feet above the rope. The pathway is clearly left of #1 and right of #2 (IOW, right up the middle of the bolts to the right of #3). It looked possible for both to be located in a much straighter line through the features.
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