Route Guide - iPhone / Android - Partners - Forum - Photos - Deals - What's New - School of Rock
Login with Facebook
 ADVANCED

Urban Climber Buys Climbing Magazine

Submitted By: John McNamee on Jan 7, 2007


Add Comment

New York, NY, January 5th, 2007 Skram Media LLC, a platform company led by Mark Crowther, the publisher of Urban Climber Magazine and UCTV, announced today that it has completed the purchase of Climbing Magazine and climbing.com from PRIMEDIA, Inc. (NYSE:PRM). Terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

Climbing Magazine Editor-in-Chief Jonathan Thesenga will continue to serve in his role from the current location in Carbondale, Colorado.

Media Release

The times are changing...


Comments on Urban Climber Buys Climbing Magazine Add Comment
Comments displayed oldest to newestSkip Ahead to the Most Recent Dated Aug 1, 2007
By Tony B
From: Around Boulder, CO
Jan 7, 2007

Kind of and kind of not. One of the mags was bought out by some company HQ'd in Florida or something crazy like that years ago and not that much changed... Seems to me it was Climbing... Whichever one Micheal Kennedy used to run.

By D Argyle
From: Englewood, CO
Jan 8, 2007

Maybe this could be a good thing for the mag?

FROM ALPINIST NEWSWIRE:

" ...Urban Climber, which began in 2004, focuses on bouldering, gym and sport climbing. Now that it is the parent company of Climbing Magazine, Climbing "might not feel quite so much pressure to target the youth" with its editorial, according to MacDonald..."

Not that I have anything against youth, but it'd be nice to see more trad and alpine in the rag, and fewer bling bling Blurr ads and plastic comp kiddies spewing " omg! i've never climbed outside! I'm really excited to try it someday!" etc.

imo of course

By bbrock
From: Al
Jan 8, 2007

Everybody seems to be giving climbing magazine a hard time. The magazine is definitely not what it used to be, but hey nothing is in this watered down world that we live in. I get around 10-15 minutes a month of entertainment from the magazine. That comes out to a couple hours a year of entertainment for my $20 subscription. I'll be renewing my subscription plus I love the car ads. I'm thinking about getting a Nissan X-terra. The people in those ads appear to be really hardcore.

By John McNamee
Administrator
From: Littleton, CO
Jan 9, 2007

Here's the link to a news item on Alpinist about the sale of climbing mag.

Alpinist

By USBRIT
From: Cumbria.UK
Jan 11, 2007

God help us . I guessing we will get even MORE boring pics and articles on sit start boulders,sport and plastic climbing.Perhaps give it a couple of issues or so and see what happens ?? Car ads !! .....

By Ian Wolfe
From: Fayetteville, NC
Jan 12, 2007

If Climbing focuses on bouldering, that's fine with me. They will never equal the Alpinist for trad and alpine climbs. It's great to have an archivable climbing mag.

By M.Morley
Administrator
From: Sacramento, CA
Jan 13, 2007

What's a climbing magazine to do?

As a business, you need money to keep afloat, pay your staff, and keep the heat from being turned off in those cold winter months (wait, Carbondale gets cold?). Therefore, you need advertisers to subsidize the printing and overhead costs (alternately, charge more for the magazine and then have everyone bitch about how expensive it is).

Ads account for roughly 50% of content in your typical outdoor mag. Advertisers advertise with the belief that those who buy the magazine are good candidates (the target market) for buying their products. The bottom line is that younger climbers are more likely to drop money building a rack, the cool $80 Prana pants, and the $200 foam pad. The rest of us (older than about 30) already have too much stuff as it is!

The result is that you have to keep appealing to the younger/next generation. That means plan on seeing more bouldering, indoor comps and plastic-pulling 8-year-olds that can climb the 5.14 pink route at the local gym.

Or maybe we should all just buy a Nissan Xterra?

By TBlom
Jan 15, 2007

I personally don't understand why anyone would want to urbanize climbing. Climbing and Rock and Ice have already given in to the use of slang I don't even understand(i.e. urban slang). The content has largely turned to crap, articles where top climbers make fun of other climbers, talk about "makin' millions" and who is cool do nothing for climbing as a sport. Call me closed minded, but when did hip-hop/urban/graffiti culture have anything to do with climbing? Furthermore, why would I want such attitude in the great outdoors? It's bad enough in the ski/snowboard industry, why climbing?
While I still enjoy reading the mags occasionally, I gave up on subscriptions years ago with the rise of auto ads and decline in info.
Also, why is it that skateboard/snowboard/ski mags can have so many cool photos, and we are only relegated to a choice few?

By SirVato
From: Boulder
Jan 16, 2007

TEVIS SAYS:"Call me closed minded, but when did hip-hop/urban/graffiti culture have anything to do with climbing?"

Hey Blom,I resemble that remark!!! Is that why you don't hang out with me anymore?? ;-)

Well I'd have to say when the younger generation started climbing. If no youth climbed the sport would die off eventually. Well, being that "hip-hop" is the voice of a young generation I'd have to go with "you should've seen this coming". I mean c'mon Dan Osman for example; The rebelious, long haired rock and roller, in his hay day that was the thing, hair bands and rock and roll. Personally I'd rather see every one be themselves in life but we're gonna have chenge with each new generation. Now it just so happens that it's either "Trusta-farian" of Hip-hop and, I gotta tell you I'm not a big fan of dreads. . .or fake hippies.

As for photos, It's easy to sit next to a pipe or, bowl(not THAT kind pot-heads) and click shots of some wanna-be "dogtowner" launching out of it. You of all people know that setting up to shoot climbing pics is hard. How many times have we said "oh yeah we'll fix a line and shoot photos of so-and-so on lead. . . Yeah right, we came to climb not jug a rope!!! And the GOOD shots in mags are usually taken from some sort of rig or boom.

But, I have to agree if the Mag looks to be bouldering based, I'm not into it. I'll keep my Alpinist fix going.

And, "hip-Hop" is not that bad. Sure if we're talking fake gangsta, 45cent, dough and ho's, bling-bling, got my "GAT" MTV bullshit then yup, keep that shit out of climbing and, the mags.

But chances are you'll see my hip-hoppin' ass at Eldo with a face-full of slang mockery, a bandana, tattooed stomach, and some break-dancin'!!

Wanna pull some plastic tomorrow night??

Oh and, THIS

By TBlom
Jan 16, 2007

My man Rich tellin' it straight!

I'll catch yer ass anytime!

By Charlie Perry
Jan 30, 2007

I am not of the younger generation. I started climbing around when friends were coming on the scene. I started climbing because I was into adventure in high far away places. I have been subscribing to Climbing almost from it's inception. I read climbing to inspire me. Something like "Cool, look at those photos of Slipstream in Canada" I want to climb that. If climbing is reduced to "Johnny is the first in the world to pull the 6.14 twenty foot cave problem" then I guess I am out. I just cannot see myself saying to my wife "Gee honey. I am going to Hueco tanks to work on fifteen feet of rock for the next six months!Don't forget to feed the cat while I am gone". There is nothing wrong with bouldering. But if you look at the roots of climbing it is far from bouldering. It was based on adventure. So if Urban Climber focuses on the new boulder problem of today, hasta la vista to my subscription since (I think) sometime in the seventies. I hope they are fair and balanced (unlike fox and friends). I spent over two grand on ice, rock, big wall, ski equipment this year. I still need two new 8 mils and a 10.5 mil to replace my old stuff. New Mountaineering boots and the new MSR reactor stove looks mighty fine. I really like the new shells from Mammut for those afternoon rain showers at lumpy, and I need new clothes for climbing. I guess us over forty crowd who are making over or close to six figures just don't buy climbing gear. We are just engulfed in keeping our AARP subscriptions as well as our medicare and marijuana for glaucoma prescriptions valid.

By Jeff G.
From: Fort Collins
Aug 1, 2007

Well said Charlie!