Gold Country
Submitted by: Aron Quiter
New Rock! New Rock! Come and Get it!
The foothills of the northern Sierra Nevada are a vast and mostly untamed stretch of rocky hillsides. Bouldering is everywhere, and sport is plentiful. Trad routes can be found, but are often undocumented and wild.

Areas in the foothills may not be documented. A lot of climbable rock is found on private property, and also in public areas where local land managers don't believe that climbing is a reputable sport. Auburn State Recreation Area had a rocky history, but the administrators and climbing community are building bridges there.

Weather in the foothills is some of the most varied in California: In the summer temperatures often exceed 100 degrees, yet in the winter you will find snow often as low as 2000 feet. Spring and Fall are often the best times to climb, but keep in mind elevations and recent rainfall and you can find wonderful days in the winter as well.

New rock is always just over the next ridge, and all you need is a little imagination and some forestry maps, and you can find the next climbing area in California.
Getting There
Gold Country describes the regions around route 49, which winds through the northern Sierra Nevada foothills (and into the higher mountains above), and connects many historic mid 19th century Gold Rush settlements. This a large area. Ranging from around Coursegold in the south, it reaches nearly the Downieville in the north. Elevations range from near sea level in the central valley itself, up to thousands of feet as the foothills rise towards the heart of the Sierra Nevada.
Photos
Oak Trees-Foothills.
Photo by Blitzo.
Oak Trees-Foothills. Photo by Blitzo.

Foothill Sunset.
Photo by Blitzo.
Foothill Sunset. Photo by Blitzo.

Sugar Pine.
Photo by Blitzo.
Sugar Pine. Photo by Blitzo.

Great stone!
Photo by Blitzo.
Great stone! Photo by Blitzo.

Digger Pine aka Grey Pine.
Photo by Blitzo.
Digger Pine aka Grey Pine. Photo by Blitzo.

Digger pine cones.
Photo by Blitzo.
Digger pine cones. Photo by Blitzo.

Meadows.
Photo by Blitzo.
Meadows. Photo by Blitzo.

Common Yarrow (Achillea Augustissima).
Photo by Blitzo.
Common Yarrow (Achillea Augustissima). Photo by Blitzo.

Lots of poison oak.
Photo by Blitzo.
Lots of poison oak. Photo by Blitzo.

Sierra Foothills granite.
Photo by Blitzo.
Sierra Foothills granite. Photo by Blitzo.

Pine Rose leaves.
Photo by Blitzo.
Pine Rose leaves. Photo by Blitzo.

Soft Arnica?
Photo by Blitzo.
Soft Arnica? Photo by Blitzo.

Large Mountain Monkeyflower.
Photo by Blitzo.
Large Mountain Monkeyflower. Photo by Blitzo.

Sugar Pine Cone.
Photo by Blitzo.
Sugar Pine Cone. Photo by Blitzo.

Live Oak?
Photo by Blitzo.
Live Oak? Photo by Blitzo.

Lakes.
Photo by Blitzo.
Lakes. Photo by Blitzo.

Live oak bark detail?
Photo by Blitzo.
Live oak bark detail? Photo by Blitzo.

In the oak forest.
Photo by Blitzo.
In the oak forest. Photo by Blitzo.

Mistletoe.
Photo by Blitzo.
Mistletoe. Photo by Blitzo.

Poison oak is nice in late season color.
Photo by Blitzo.
Poison oak is nice in late season color. Photo by Blitzo.

© 2014 Mountain Project Inc.